Posts by: Kelsey Rinella

Review: Ento

The guess-making screen

Kevin Spacey turns in a surprisingly chilling performance as the voice of a grasshopper who runs a protection racket.

In 2001, Zendo turned science into a boardgame, but wrapped it in a mystical Buddhist theme. Ento, first entry into the iOS space from Omino Games, eschews the competitive element for a pure puzzle, and returns the theme to the more natural fit of science. It takes the form of a rather stilted correspondence between Charles and Alfred. Poor Alfred has to try and deduce whatever rule of taxonomy Charles has in mind by sending him collections of insects and getting back a simple thumbs up or down on whether they follow the rule. Naturally, this requires sending lots of insects, so, basically, it’s a postal worker’s misery simulator.

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WUHRhammer: Arcane Magic coming soon

Nanoo nanoo?

Nanoo nanoo?

Games Workshop must have the hardest-working licensing department outside of Disney. A new iOS game from Turbo Tape, the developers of UHR Warlords, will have you slinging spell cards as famous wizards in tactical combat in the Warhammer universe “soon” (synonymous with “this year” in marketing cant). If you read that sentence and took away cards, Warhammer, and tactical, I know where you’re coming from, but the Turbo Tape bit is also worth noting. UHR Warlords was so metal it kind of lampooned itself, but the tactical elements were balanced and engaging. In retrospect, the grimdark aesthetic appears to have found an appreciative audience in the original grim darkness of the far future folks. After the break you’ll see a trailer, and several tasty screenshots.

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Review: Honeycomb Hotel ULTRA

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The middle of three levels of difficulty. I was unwilling to insult Pocket Tactics readers by showing you the easiest.

 

It turns out there’s a niche into which I fit perfectly but never knew existed: fans of Everett Kaser‘s games. My love of logic puzzles as a child grew into eager anticipation of each new Analytical Reasoning (that is, logic games) section of the LSAT back when I taught LSAT prep, and has now matured into almost compulsive Honeycomb Hotel play. It has the usual sorts of clues, A and B are in the same row, C is farther left than D, and so forth, but it does it all on a hexagonal board and adds a path which enters and exists each hex exactly once. The hexagon thing is probably the less significant gameplay innovation, but as the official polygon of Pocket Tactics, it gets top billing.

There’s also no avoiding the fact that the graphics hail from the era in which we chiseled our computers out of granite and Lite Brite was advanced display technology. You can choose from several tile sets, but they’re all basically eye broccoli. Like Dream Quest, the aesthetic sends a message; in this case, it reinforces the nature of the game as an exercise in pure logic. It’s a valuable way of filtering players; I expect many users will see a screenshot and instantly move on to something else. Those who don’t are likely open to a sterile presentation of the purest form of puzzle.

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Review: Corto Maltese Secrets of Venice

The artist who drew this gets my respect--the window, the light--just lovely.

In Venice, drugstore stockrooms apparently have golems. Theft of prescription medications was getting out of hand, I guess.

Corto Maltese Secrets of Venice (a title which appears to have undergone a colectomy) brings legendary comic book character Corto Maltese to iDevices everywhere! At least, they tell me he’s legendary–I’d never heard of him before, but he seems to visit exotic locations and delve into ancient secrets while being at least moderately competent, so I’m basically thinking of him as a sort of Mediterranean Tintin or Indiana Jones. The game seems to aim at the familiar adventure genre, with lovely hidden object scenes and a variety of basic puzzles interspersed with some largely linear plot, but comes at it from a perspective which leaves the whole affair feeling not entirely comfortably foreign.

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Review: Pentaction Medieval

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Everything you need to know, nicely presented on a single page. Well, everything except how you got yourself into this horrible position.

“Pentaction” is an awkward mouthful of a title. Descriptive, though: the relations between the five mobile units are the heart of this game that plays like a twist on Stratego. Your opponent’s pawns on the other side of the board are unknown to you — until you attack one or it attacks you, revealing its strength. Reveal your opponent’s helpless king piece and you win.

It plays fast and bloody–three minutes is usually enough to reduce both sides to a few units and one to a captured king. These boardgame-style units are lovingly rendered as wooden pieces with identities stamped on with primitive printing technology, which helps to sell the medieval theme if you can get past the fact that you’re interacting with their high-resolution images on the most technologically advanced device you’ve ever owned. Pentaction represents a departure for Hunted Cow, a simple boardgame reminiscent of Stratego rather than any sort of conflict simulation.

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Strategy Game of the Year 2014

Your nearest emergency exit may be behind you.

Your nearest emergency exit may be behind you.

If you find yourself disillusioned with Kickstarter, blame FTL. Many of us hit the jackpot on our very first pull of that one-armed bandit, and have been pulling and pulling since with only a sore arm and tragic updates to show for it. In 2012, the PC version of the game made “roguelike” a household world (also “rougelike”, spelling being the challenge that it is), but it didn’t just reintroduce a once-ubiquitous game type. Instead, it executed that with a spacefaring setting, a utilitarian, understated style, and clever writing. Also, it’s charmingly open about kicking players in the crotch.

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Review: FRAMED

A dark alley.

One of the more interesting rotations in the game. If I were a better geek, I could make a clever reference to mathematical transformations here, and those few of you who got it would feel special.

Her knock said she expected to be welcome anywhere, she didn’t need to be boorish about it. I give a doll a thorough once-over when she first walks in, but she was short enough it was more like a half-over. Not a real deep thinker, but if I looked and moved like she did, maybe I wouldn’t bother so much about my brain, either. Guess it’s good for my work I look like I do.

FRAMED looks like a graphic novel adaptation of a Dashiell Hammett yarn, with motion that looks just uncanny enough to seem like brilliant animation rather than merely adequate motion capture. You rearrange (and, occasionally, rotate) the frames of each page, altering the story in order to escape with a briefcase. There’s a touch of variety to the plot and gameplay injected by introducing different playable characters, but the MacGuffin remains the same throughout. Also, developers Loveshack credit the Australian government during the opening. That’s not really relevant, I just thought it was groovy.

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